MegaHouse G.E.M. Gintama Hijikata Toushirou

I don’t own many male figures, and I don’t own any other Gintama (銀魂) figure. But after seeing the pre-order picture for this Hijikata Toushirou PVC from the Gintama series, I placed an order for him. Maybe it’s his cool looks, or maybe it’s the extravagant mayonnaise display (see details below). Either way the Shinsenguimi number two now joins the rare group in my figure collection. MegaHouse isn’t exactly known to make really great figures. For the Gintama series, they have previously released Sakata Gintoki in April of 2010. The Gintoki figure really did not impress me. I thought they have really done a poor job on the series’ main character. But this Hijikata figure seems to be much better than Gintoki especially in terms of the face sculpture and the paint. Another figure in the same series Sougo Okita is slated to be released in October 2010.

G.E.M. Series Gintama Hijikata Toushirou 1/8 PVC by MegaHouse (銀魂 土方 十四郎).Original Sculptor Moriwaki Naoto (森脇直人). Released on June 2010 with an MSRP of ¥6,600.

Still in the box, front and back.

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Figure/doll photography 121 – How to produce white background

This is another one of my figure/doll photography 121 post. A few months ago, I’ve posted an article on how to produce a true black background without the use of any black background material and/or image editing software. I wrote about the black background because I find most people does not know how light works its magic in a photography sense. The people I talk to tends to instinctively come to the conclusion that if a photo’s background is black, then there must be something black behind it. If you have read my article, then you would see that a true black background actually resulted from a lack of light coming towards to your camera. Today I want to look at the opposite side of the gray scale — how to produce a white background?

Well again a lot of people instinctively think that a white background is the result of placing some kind of white material behind the subject. Below is a photo that I took in front of a white fabric backdrop. However, when compared to the white frame that borders the picture, you can clearly see that the actual background is not 100% white. In fact if you load it into an image editing software, you will see that the background is somewhere between 96% – 92% on the gray scale. On the gray scale there’s only one white point which is at the very end of the gray scale. Anything that’s not 100% on the gray scale, or 255, 255, 255 in RGB value is not pure white. And 255, 255, 255 RGB value is what the background must be if we were to call it a true white background. Anything less is just a different shades of gray.

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